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Lifestyle

The Coronavirus Lockdown Has Helped Marine Life Finally Enjoy Peace and Quiet

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As the world continues to battle with the new reality of being under lockdown due to the Coronavirus outbreak, the natural and wildlife world are enjoying some much needed respite from human noise and pollution.

New research from Seabed Observatories has revealed a significant drop in the low-frequency sounds associated with ships and boats, helping to make oceans, lakes, and waterways tranquil spaces for marine life, which is opening up the chance for experts to carry out research never considered possible before.

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lockdown ocean noise reduction

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With the coronavirus still keeping much of the world under lockdown, international and domestic travel has either been dramatically reduced or completely stopped.

Without planes, boats, cruise liners and other machines constantly passing over and through oceans and land, wildlife has been able to enjoy some much needed rest, which in turn has opened up the opportunity for wildlife and nature experts to carry out research.

The reduction of noise has meant that once-in-a-lifetime studies, typically not available to be conducted, can now be carried out.

Whales, who have never experienced a quiet ocean in their lives and are often put under enormous stress due to the volume of human noise in the oceans, calling behaviour, seabed changes due to the drop in human ocean traffic, the movement of species, who would have otherwise never moved from their typical habitats, around the ocean can all be analysed and studied.

The changes to nature caused by the coronavirus could potentially lead to new research and findings which were never thought possible pre-lockdown.

To find out more about the lockdown ocean noise reduction research visit Ocean Networks Canada online.

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